Carnellan (Ingleston, Twynholm)

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  • #1329
    John Shields
    Keymaster

    From Michael Ansell to David Devereux – 29 June 2020. Following on from Ingleston (Twynholm) field names discussions

    Good morning David, thanks for this. On a different subject but related to the photo of the map you attached, I see there is a place called Carnellan on there, just south of the Low Bridge of Tarff but I don’t see this on the OS 1st ed 6’’ map, do you know anything about that place-name?

    It looks like ‘Low Lodge’ is in the vicinity of Carnellan but on the wrong side of the road.

    • This topic was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by John Shields.
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    #1331
    John Shields
    Keymaster

    From David Devereux – 30 June 2020

    Thanks for pointing out Carnellan. It also appears on Ainslie’s county map of 1797 (but he may have simply Gillone’s Kirkcudbright map?) but not on Roy’s survey or on the 1st ed. OS as you say. So far I haven’t been able to find any further reference to it in documentary sources – no mention in the 1819 valuation roll – so it’s a bit of a mystery. The site of Carnellan may be occupied now by the walled garden for Cumstoun (NX 684 536), dated to the early C19th, and almost certainly related to the building of the mansion in 1828, after the Maitland family acquired the estate c.1819 (see John Gifford). So that might be the time when Carnellan disappeared. I’ll keep looking for any other references to the place.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by John Shields.
    #1332
    John Shields
    Keymaster

    From Alan James – 30 June 2020

    Yes, there seems to be no trace of Carnellan post-Gillone.

    The name is intriguing, the closest hint I can find is the name McGillelan mentioned by Watson CPNS 164 as ‘chief of Clan Connan in Galloway in the reign of David II’.

    Now he’s Mac Gille Fhaolain, and (one of the numerous saints named) Fáelán was the dedicatee of Kilfillan in Sorbie (Watson has ‘Kilphillan in Wigtown’),

    and ‘probably’ commemorated at Airyolland x2 in Glenluce and Mochrum, and Ernfillan in Crossmichael, see https://www.saintsplaces.gla.ac.uk/saint.php?id=461

    This Carnellan might be added, at least as ‘possibly’? Mind, as the name means ‘little wolf’, *carn an fhaolain might have meant literally that.

    I’ve copied Gilbert back into the discussion, his opinion would be helpful.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by John Shields.
    #1333
    John Shields
    Keymaster

    From David Devereux – 18 July 2020

    Just a quick note to let you know that  ‘Carnellan’, Twynholm, is mentioned in the Kirkcudbright Kirk Session minutes in 1776. Two servants from there  – Alan McConnall and Helen McGown  – came before the Session. The spelling of the p-n is the same as on the Gillone and Ainslie maps. Good to have documentary confirmation of the place, but I guess a variant form of the spelling might have been helpful.

    #1334
    John Shields
    Keymaster

    From Michael Ansell – 18 July 2020

    Many thanks David. It is strange that Sir Herbert Maxwell didn’t mention it. Nor does it seem to feature in any charter documentation that I have seen. So it’s good to see evidence of its 18th Century existence at least. I’m curious as to whether it might have been a quarterland, ceathramh (a quarter) can be rounded down in the anglicisation process to carn/cairn, amongst other things.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by John Shields.
    #1340
    John Shields
    Keymaster

    From Alan James – 19 July 2020

    It’s probably no help at all, but Carnellan is on record as a Cornish surname, probably from a place-name, though not in Oliver Padel’s Cornish PN Elements. He mentions Carnello x2, but gives no opinion on the 2nd element, and the first could be carn or corn. Bannister’s 1871 Glossary of Cornish Names, where I found it online, suggests ‘elm?’ That would be elowen, not paralleled in Welsh; C elen, W elain, ‘fawn’ might be more plausible. I don’t find anything remotely similar in Archif Melville RIchards, but W cornelyn ‘small corner’ might just be in the picture. Suffice to say, it might just possibly be Brittonic. But without more earlier/ varied forms and/or any idea where it was, we’re entirely in the fog.

    Still, thanks for the additional reference David!

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